MES: Industrial Odyssey [Visual Explainer]

The Power of Manufacturing Execution Systems

Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES) track and document the transformation of raw materials to finished products.

An MES arms manufacturing decision makers with info to optimize operations and improve output.

Real-time Data Tracking

An MES captures important information regarding production process, machine status, and quality metrics to drive decision making.

Process Control

MES tools monitor and control manufacturing processes, ensuring they adhere to relevant regulations and guidelines.

Production Scheduling

MES solutions optimize resources by ensuring goods are manufactured in the most efficient sequences possible.

Quality Management

An MES can alert operators or stop production if quality issues are detected.

Inventory Management

MES supports lean manufacturing with its material and usage tracking throughout the production process.

Documentation

MES platforms generate valuable information for documentation and reporting on production records, quality metrics, equipment status, and much more.

Popular MES Platforms

There’s a wide variety of MES solutions for specific industries and needs. Some of the most common tools include: Siemens Opcenter, Oodoo, Plex, SAP, Parsec Automation TrakSYS, Pico, Fishbowl, Katana, FactoryTalk, ShiftWorx, HYDRA by MPDV USA, Eyelit, MasterControl, Epicor, Infor, and DELMIAWorks.

1940s-60s: Mainframes

Computerized systems for production became with mainframe computers in the 1940s, mostly for finance and accounting applications before extending into production cost and inventory analysis.

1960s: MRP Systems

Material Requirements Planning (MRP) systems emerged in the 1960s. The technology converts production plans into lists of required materials for manufacturing.

1980s: MRP II

Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II) emerged in the ’80s, expanding the scope of MRP to include human resources (HR), finance, equipment, and energy.

1990: Official Naming

The term MES was coined by ARM Research in 1990.

1992: MESA

The Manufacturing Execution Systems Association, now known as Manufacturing Enterprise Solutions Association, assembles to define a set of MES application functionalities.

1997: MESA-11 Model

MESA-11 model outlines 11 core functions of MES, including operations, production unit dispatching, product tracking, and quality management.

2000: ANSI-ISA-95 Standard

The International Society of Automation released the ANSI-ISA-95 standard to establish a framework for MES platforms.

2004: c-MES Model

MESA’s Collaborative MES (c-MES) model expands MESA-11 to include other business processes.

2008: Latest MES Model

The latest MESA model emphasizes interconnection between production and strategy in manufacturing.

Today and Beyond

Analysts estimate the MES market’s value at $12.5B-182B USD. Growth predictions range from $20B by 2027 to $36.9B in coming years. Advancements in tech like AI, machine learning, IoT, and more continue to expand MES’s robustness.

Featured Videos

Digital twins are everywhere.

The virtual replicas of physical entities are revolutionizing industries from manufacturing to healthcare to urban planning with their advanced simulation capabilities.

Let's examine how we got here and where we may be heading.

Emerging from the aerospace and automotive industries, digital twin technology is now gaining popularity across sectors. The virtual replicas of real-world entities are used for comprehensive simulations, predictive maintenance, and virtual prototyping.

0:17 Alan Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Though it’s primarily focused on AI, Turing’s paper provides the theoretical and computational foundations necessary to build smart, data-driven virtual models of physical assets.

1:06 First Commercial Computer (UNIVAC I)
The UNIVAC, the first commercially produced computer in the United States, is released in 1951. First deployed at the US Census Bureau, the UNIVAC I offers a glimpse into the potential of computing to handle vast amounts of data quickly and accurately to solve complex problems.

1:59 Monte Carlo Simulations
Monte Carlo simulations go mainstream around 1952. The experimentation method was initially developed for the Manhattan Project efforts to create an atomic bomb during World War II.

2:10 Development of FORTRAN
In the mid-50s, IBM’s FORTRAN delivers the computational power necessary for early forms of digital modeling and simulations. Its ability to handle large-scale computations and numerical analysis advances technology required for future digital twinning.

2:37 Launch of Sputnik and Advances in Aerospace Simulation
In 1957, the Soviet Union launches Sputnik, touching off the Space Race with the United States that accelerates simulation technology. The pressure pushes scientists to develop superior computer models to predict satellite paths and behavior in space.

3:09 Digital Simulation in Aerospace
In the early 1960s, the aerospace industry begins using digital simulations to design and test aircraft. 

3:22 Introduction of CAD (Computer-Aided Design)
Ivan Sutherland develops Sketchpad for computer-aided design. It revolutionizes the way engineers and designers work by enabling precise digital drawings and models.

3:33 1964 - Jay Forrester Introduces System Dynamics
In 1964, Jay Forrester introduces System Dynamics, a methodology for modeling and simulating complex systems. 

3:57 1970 - Apollo 13 Lunar Mission
In April 1970, the Apollo 13 mission to the Moon almost ends tragically. 

4:16 1982 - Release of Autodesk's AutoCAD
In the early 1980s, CAD software enters the mainstream. 

4:45 Advancements in Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Systems
Throughout the 1990s, PLM platforms integrate various tools and processes, including CAD, to ensure consistency and accuracy of data and enhanced communication across departments.

5:21 Dr. Michael Grieves Coins the Term "Digital Twin"
In 2002, Michael Grieves introduces the concept of the digital twin at a Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference in Michigan.

5:47 NASA's Strategic Roadmap for Digital Twin Technology
In 2010, NASA develops a strategic roadmap for digital twin adoption for future missions.

6:09 Industry 4.0 Concept Introduced
The fourth industrial revolution begins in earnest in 2011 as the Industry 4.0 concept is introduced at Germany’s Hannover Messe. 

6:40 General Electric's Digital Twin for Industrial Internet
In 2017, General Electric introduces its digital twin technology for industrial applications.

7:02 Microsoft's Azure Digital Twins Platform
The 2018 launch of Microsoft’s Azure Digital Twins platform accelerates adoption with a comprehensive cloud-based service. 

7:25 COVID-19 Pandemic Accelerates Digital Twin Adoption
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic accelerates the adoption of advanced manufacturing technologies, including digital twins, as companies seek to mitigate the disruptions in their operations, supply chains, and workforces.

7:37 Siemens Xcelerator Platform
Siemens introduces its Xcelerator platform in 2021.

8:00 NVIDIA Omniverse Platform
NVIDIA’s Omniverse platform, introduced in 2023, integrates AI, simulation, and photorealistic visualization technologies

8:20 Manufacturers Embrace the Industrial Metaverse
Heading into the mid-2020s, manufacturers warm up to the industrial metaverse. 

8:35 2030s - Digital Twins Become More Intelligent and Autonomous

9:11 2040s - Synthetic Holos Replace Digital Twins


#digitaltwin #digitaltransformation #industry40 #singularity #artificialintelligence #ai #machinelearning #robotics #humanoid #humanoidrobot #humanoidrobots #digitalthread #plm #digitalengineering #cad #3d #bigdata #blockchain #iiot #4ir #manufacturing #digitaltwins #futuretechnology #futuretech #smartcity #iot #internetofthings #innovation #quantumcomputing #digitalimmortality #transhumanism #simulation

Digital twins are everywhere.

The virtual replicas of physical entities are revolutionizing industries from manufacturing to healthcare to urban planning with their advanced simulation capabilities.

Let's examine how we got here and where we may be heading.

Emerging from the aerospace and automotive industries, digital twin technology is now gaining popularity across sectors. The virtual replicas of real-world entities are used for comprehensive simulations, predictive maintenance, and virtual prototyping.

0:17 Alan Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Though it’s primarily focused on AI, Turing’s paper provides the theoretical and computational foundations necessary to build smart, data-driven virtual models of physical assets.

1:06 First Commercial Computer (UNIVAC I)
The UNIVAC, the first commercially produced computer in the United States, is released in 1951. First deployed at the US Census Bureau, the UNIVAC I offers a glimpse into the potential of computing to handle vast amounts of data quickly and accurately to solve complex problems.

1:59 Monte Carlo Simulations
Monte Carlo simulations go mainstream around 1952. The experimentation method was initially developed for the Manhattan Project efforts to create an atomic bomb during World War II.

2:10 Development of FORTRAN
In the mid-50s, IBM’s FORTRAN delivers the computational power necessary for early forms of digital modeling and simulations. Its ability to handle large-scale computations and numerical analysis advances technology required for future digital twinning.

2:37 Launch of Sputnik and Advances in Aerospace Simulation
In 1957, the Soviet Union launches Sputnik, touching off the Space Race with the United States that accelerates simulation technology. The pressure pushes scientists to develop superior computer models to predict satellite paths and behavior in space.

3:09 Digital Simulation in Aerospace
In the early 1960s, the aerospace industry begins using digital simulations to design and test aircraft.

3:22 Introduction of CAD (Computer-Aided Design)
Ivan Sutherland develops Sketchpad for computer-aided design. It revolutionizes the way engineers and designers work by enabling precise digital drawings and models.

3:33 1964 - Jay Forrester Introduces System Dynamics
In 1964, Jay Forrester introduces System Dynamics, a methodology for modeling and simulating complex systems.

3:57 1970 - Apollo 13 Lunar Mission
In April 1970, the Apollo 13 mission to the Moon almost ends tragically.

4:16 1982 - Release of Autodesk's AutoCAD
In the early 1980s, CAD software enters the mainstream.

4:45 Advancements in Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Systems
Throughout the 1990s, PLM platforms integrate various tools and processes, including CAD, to ensure consistency and accuracy of data and enhanced communication across departments.

5:21 Dr. Michael Grieves Coins the Term "Digital Twin"
In 2002, Michael Grieves introduces the concept of the digital twin at a Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference in Michigan.

5:47 NASA's Strategic Roadmap for Digital Twin Technology
In 2010, NASA develops a strategic roadmap for digital twin adoption for future missions.

6:09 Industry 4.0 Concept Introduced
The fourth industrial revolution begins in earnest in 2011 as the Industry 4.0 concept is introduced at Germany’s Hannover Messe.

6:40 General Electric's Digital Twin for Industrial Internet
In 2017, General Electric introduces its digital twin technology for industrial applications.

7:02 Microsoft's Azure Digital Twins Platform
The 2018 launch of Microsoft’s Azure Digital Twins platform accelerates adoption with a comprehensive cloud-based service.

7:25 COVID-19 Pandemic Accelerates Digital Twin Adoption
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic accelerates the adoption of advanced manufacturing technologies, including digital twins, as companies seek to mitigate the disruptions in their operations, supply chains, and workforces.

7:37 Siemens Xcelerator Platform
Siemens introduces its Xcelerator platform in 2021.

8:00 NVIDIA Omniverse Platform
NVIDIA’s Omniverse platform, introduced in 2023, integrates AI, simulation, and photorealistic visualization technologies

8:20 Manufacturers Embrace the Industrial Metaverse
Heading into the mid-2020s, manufacturers warm up to the industrial metaverse.

8:35 2030s - Digital Twins Become More Intelligent and Autonomous

9:11 2040s - Synthetic Holos Replace Digital Twins


#digitaltwin #digitaltransformation #industry40 #singularity #artificialintelligence #ai #machinelearning #robotics #humanoid #humanoidrobot #humanoidrobots #digitalthread #plm #digitalengineering #cad #3d #bigdata #blockchain #iiot #4ir #manufacturing #digitaltwins #futuretechnology #futuretech #smartcity #iot #internetofthings #innovation #quantumcomputing #digitalimmortality #transhumanism #simulation

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YouTube Video UExZUkdCOF9hWE80bk5tUTZpWFNfY05naTZ3cmQzWmFSYi4wN0FBRUVFNEVBMTZBQ0Mx

Digital Twin 100-Year Timeline: From Early Simulation Technology to Synthetic Human Integrations

Kalil 4.0 June 10, 2024 5:23 am