The Trends That Will Define B2B Digital Marketing in the 2020s

My career in digital marketing started in 2008 when I took an entry-level job as an SEO copywriter at a tiny web design firm.

This was on the tail-end of spammy tactics such as keyword stuffing and SEO link directories being effective. If you happened to know one of the 10 DMOZ editors still active at the time, you could boost your PageRank a point. And PageRank was still a thing.

I wrote content for search engines more than humans, and it showed. But everyone was doing it.

Sometime around 2009-2010 was when things really started to change. Business owners who were reluctant to blog were launching Twitter profiles. Global corporations embedded their latest tweets on their homepages.

Here are my predictions about how digital marketing will look in the coming decade.

Digital marketing managers

Job titles that contain “digital marketing” now will become less and less common. Unless you’re really good at finessing, you can’t survive as a marketer today without at least basic knowledge about digital marketing.

Go look up some marketing manger job postings. You’ll notice that they usually demand experience with CRMs, marketing automation, content management systems, social media, SEO and just about everything else that’s under the digital marketing umbrella.

If you’re a traditional marketer, now is the time to expand your digital marketing expertise unless you plan to retire in the next few years. And if you’re a digital marketer, take advantage of opportunities to learn the fundamentals of marketing. Your next job title could be “marketing manager” even though everything you do revolves around the Internet.

Minimalism

When businesses hopped on the Web 2.0 bandwagon a decade ago, the advice they got was almost completely different than what they’d hear today:

  • Be everywhere: Everybody needs to be on every social network! At one point, I got dinged on a Hubspot quiz because I said SEO was more important than social media. Everyone was taking their cues from self-described social media mavens who mostly just padded each other on the back until everyone tuned them out.
  • Throw the kitchen sink at website visitors: In the early 2010s, corporate websites had hokey Twitter feeds embedded on their homepages, ugly keyword clouds in widget areas, autoplay videos and music, and gigantic social media share icons.
  • Use as many plugins as you can: If you were launching a WordPress or Joomla! site 10 years ago, you’d be told to you must use 15-25 plugins. Who cares if it slows pagespeed own more if visitors can see snowflakes fall on your homepage in December, right?
  • Get as many links as you can: Truth be told, I scored some links from some pretty shady sites that boosted rankings significantly. That would never happen today.

Toward the end of the 2010s, the way of thinking changed. Now you’re told:

  • Be where your customers are: Not every business needs daily Instagram posts. You can ignore TikTok for the time being. No one is interested in B2B Snapchat accounts. However, I still recommend at least starting an account when a new social media platform blows up to prevent the competition for taking your username.
  • Eliminate distractions on your website: It should be a tool for customers to learn and communicate with your business. Anything that gets in the way can negatively impact profits.
  • Use only the plugins you need: There is no reason to use a plugin unless there’s no other way to accomplish something. Too many plugins will reduce your site’s speed (and possibly rankings, though that’s hotly contested right now) and introduce security vulnerabilities. Just a few weeks ago, the WP Database Reset plugin was exposed for allowing non-logged in users to make edits! I’ve actually used that plugin before when I had to troubleshoot a hacked blog without FTP access but I deleted it right away. If I have to use a plugin for a quick task, I’ll do it in a staging area and deactivate/delete it before moving to the live site. Be careful out there.
  • Disavow fishy links: I don’t agree with this one but it’s still common advice. If you haven’t engaged in black hat link building, you don’t need to worry about disavowing every spammy website that links to you. Any site that’s been around for a few years has suspect inbound links.

More sales alignment

Marketing and sales departments are usually at least a little adversarial. Marketers think the hard work is getting the leads to flow in, and salespeople think the hard part is closing the deal. I’m a marketer with no interest in adopting a salesperson lifestyle so I’ll go ahead and say their job is harder. Even though it’s not.

If you’re an in-house marketer, the best way to move up the ladder is to develop a close relationship with sales. Make yourself indispensable to the sales team.

As a digital marketer, you’ll be even more valuable if you can troubleshoot issues with SFDC and talk intelligently about sales cycles. You don’t need to live and breathe sales to do this. You’d be surprised what you can learn just eavesdropping.

More DIY

Large corporations will always spend a fortune on their digital marketing. A $100K website is nothing to a multi-billion-dollar company but it’s out of the question for mid-sized companies.

Amateur website publishing has been a thing since the 90s, when I got my feet wet with Angelfire, Geocities, and AOL Members, but in 2020 it’s possible for almost anyone to build a beautiful site in a day. Even Wix and GoDaddy put the early 2010s technology to shame.

Featured Videos

Digital twins are everywhere.

The virtual replicas of physical entities are revolutionizing industries from manufacturing to healthcare to urban planning with their advanced simulation capabilities.

Let's examine how we got here and where we may be heading.

Emerging from the aerospace and automotive industries, digital twin technology is now gaining popularity across sectors. The virtual replicas of real-world entities are used for comprehensive simulations, predictive maintenance, and virtual prototyping.

0:17 Alan Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Though it’s primarily focused on AI, Turing’s paper provides the theoretical and computational foundations necessary to build smart, data-driven virtual models of physical assets.

1:06 First Commercial Computer (UNIVAC I)
The UNIVAC, the first commercially produced computer in the United States, is released in 1951. First deployed at the US Census Bureau, the UNIVAC I offers a glimpse into the potential of computing to handle vast amounts of data quickly and accurately to solve complex problems.

1:59 Monte Carlo Simulations
Monte Carlo simulations go mainstream around 1952. The experimentation method was initially developed for the Manhattan Project efforts to create an atomic bomb during World War II.

2:10 Development of FORTRAN
In the mid-50s, IBM’s FORTRAN delivers the computational power necessary for early forms of digital modeling and simulations. Its ability to handle large-scale computations and numerical analysis advances technology required for future digital twinning.

2:37 Launch of Sputnik and Advances in Aerospace Simulation
In 1957, the Soviet Union launches Sputnik, touching off the Space Race with the United States that accelerates simulation technology. The pressure pushes scientists to develop superior computer models to predict satellite paths and behavior in space.

3:09 Digital Simulation in Aerospace
In the early 1960s, the aerospace industry begins using digital simulations to design and test aircraft. 

3:22 Introduction of CAD (Computer-Aided Design)
Ivan Sutherland develops Sketchpad for computer-aided design. It revolutionizes the way engineers and designers work by enabling precise digital drawings and models.

3:33 1964 - Jay Forrester Introduces System Dynamics
In 1964, Jay Forrester introduces System Dynamics, a methodology for modeling and simulating complex systems. 

3:57 1970 - Apollo 13 Lunar Mission
In April 1970, the Apollo 13 mission to the Moon almost ends tragically. 

4:16 1982 - Release of Autodesk's AutoCAD
In the early 1980s, CAD software enters the mainstream. 

4:45 Advancements in Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Systems
Throughout the 1990s, PLM platforms integrate various tools and processes, including CAD, to ensure consistency and accuracy of data and enhanced communication across departments.

5:21 Dr. Michael Grieves Coins the Term "Digital Twin"
In 2002, Michael Grieves introduces the concept of the digital twin at a Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference in Michigan.

5:47 NASA's Strategic Roadmap for Digital Twin Technology
In 2010, NASA develops a strategic roadmap for digital twin adoption for future missions.

6:09 Industry 4.0 Concept Introduced
The fourth industrial revolution begins in earnest in 2011 as the Industry 4.0 concept is introduced at Germany’s Hannover Messe. 

6:40 General Electric's Digital Twin for Industrial Internet
In 2017, General Electric introduces its digital twin technology for industrial applications.

7:02 Microsoft's Azure Digital Twins Platform
The 2018 launch of Microsoft’s Azure Digital Twins platform accelerates adoption with a comprehensive cloud-based service. 

7:25 COVID-19 Pandemic Accelerates Digital Twin Adoption
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic accelerates the adoption of advanced manufacturing technologies, including digital twins, as companies seek to mitigate the disruptions in their operations, supply chains, and workforces.

7:37 Siemens Xcelerator Platform
Siemens introduces its Xcelerator platform in 2021.

8:00 NVIDIA Omniverse Platform
NVIDIA’s Omniverse platform, introduced in 2023, integrates AI, simulation, and photorealistic visualization technologies

8:20 Manufacturers Embrace the Industrial Metaverse
Heading into the mid-2020s, manufacturers warm up to the industrial metaverse. 

8:35 2030s - Digital Twins Become More Intelligent and Autonomous

9:11 2040s - Synthetic Holos Replace Digital Twins


#digitaltwin #digitaltransformation #industry40 #singularity #artificialintelligence #ai #machinelearning #robotics #humanoid #humanoidrobot #humanoidrobots #digitalthread #plm #digitalengineering #cad #3d #bigdata #blockchain #iiot #4ir #manufacturing #digitaltwins #futuretechnology #futuretech #smartcity #iot #internetofthings #innovation #quantumcomputing #digitalimmortality #transhumanism #simulation

Digital twins are everywhere.

The virtual replicas of physical entities are revolutionizing industries from manufacturing to healthcare to urban planning with their advanced simulation capabilities.

Let's examine how we got here and where we may be heading.

Emerging from the aerospace and automotive industries, digital twin technology is now gaining popularity across sectors. The virtual replicas of real-world entities are used for comprehensive simulations, predictive maintenance, and virtual prototyping.

0:17 Alan Turing's Computing Machinery and Intelligence
Though it’s primarily focused on AI, Turing’s paper provides the theoretical and computational foundations necessary to build smart, data-driven virtual models of physical assets.

1:06 First Commercial Computer (UNIVAC I)
The UNIVAC, the first commercially produced computer in the United States, is released in 1951. First deployed at the US Census Bureau, the UNIVAC I offers a glimpse into the potential of computing to handle vast amounts of data quickly and accurately to solve complex problems.

1:59 Monte Carlo Simulations
Monte Carlo simulations go mainstream around 1952. The experimentation method was initially developed for the Manhattan Project efforts to create an atomic bomb during World War II.

2:10 Development of FORTRAN
In the mid-50s, IBM’s FORTRAN delivers the computational power necessary for early forms of digital modeling and simulations. Its ability to handle large-scale computations and numerical analysis advances technology required for future digital twinning.

2:37 Launch of Sputnik and Advances in Aerospace Simulation
In 1957, the Soviet Union launches Sputnik, touching off the Space Race with the United States that accelerates simulation technology. The pressure pushes scientists to develop superior computer models to predict satellite paths and behavior in space.

3:09 Digital Simulation in Aerospace
In the early 1960s, the aerospace industry begins using digital simulations to design and test aircraft.

3:22 Introduction of CAD (Computer-Aided Design)
Ivan Sutherland develops Sketchpad for computer-aided design. It revolutionizes the way engineers and designers work by enabling precise digital drawings and models.

3:33 1964 - Jay Forrester Introduces System Dynamics
In 1964, Jay Forrester introduces System Dynamics, a methodology for modeling and simulating complex systems.

3:57 1970 - Apollo 13 Lunar Mission
In April 1970, the Apollo 13 mission to the Moon almost ends tragically.

4:16 1982 - Release of Autodesk's AutoCAD
In the early 1980s, CAD software enters the mainstream.

4:45 Advancements in Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Systems
Throughout the 1990s, PLM platforms integrate various tools and processes, including CAD, to ensure consistency and accuracy of data and enhanced communication across departments.

5:21 Dr. Michael Grieves Coins the Term "Digital Twin"
In 2002, Michael Grieves introduces the concept of the digital twin at a Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference in Michigan.

5:47 NASA's Strategic Roadmap for Digital Twin Technology
In 2010, NASA develops a strategic roadmap for digital twin adoption for future missions.

6:09 Industry 4.0 Concept Introduced
The fourth industrial revolution begins in earnest in 2011 as the Industry 4.0 concept is introduced at Germany’s Hannover Messe.

6:40 General Electric's Digital Twin for Industrial Internet
In 2017, General Electric introduces its digital twin technology for industrial applications.

7:02 Microsoft's Azure Digital Twins Platform
The 2018 launch of Microsoft’s Azure Digital Twins platform accelerates adoption with a comprehensive cloud-based service.

7:25 COVID-19 Pandemic Accelerates Digital Twin Adoption
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic accelerates the adoption of advanced manufacturing technologies, including digital twins, as companies seek to mitigate the disruptions in their operations, supply chains, and workforces.

7:37 Siemens Xcelerator Platform
Siemens introduces its Xcelerator platform in 2021.

8:00 NVIDIA Omniverse Platform
NVIDIA’s Omniverse platform, introduced in 2023, integrates AI, simulation, and photorealistic visualization technologies

8:20 Manufacturers Embrace the Industrial Metaverse
Heading into the mid-2020s, manufacturers warm up to the industrial metaverse.

8:35 2030s - Digital Twins Become More Intelligent and Autonomous

9:11 2040s - Synthetic Holos Replace Digital Twins


#digitaltwin #digitaltransformation #industry40 #singularity #artificialintelligence #ai #machinelearning #robotics #humanoid #humanoidrobot #humanoidrobots #digitalthread #plm #digitalengineering #cad #3d #bigdata #blockchain #iiot #4ir #manufacturing #digitaltwins #futuretechnology #futuretech #smartcity #iot #internetofthings #innovation #quantumcomputing #digitalimmortality #transhumanism #simulation

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YouTube Video UExZUkdCOF9hWE80bk5tUTZpWFNfY05naTZ3cmQzWmFSYi4wN0FBRUVFNEVBMTZBQ0Mx

Digital Twin 100-Year Timeline: From Early Simulation Technology to Synthetic Human Integrations

Kalil 4.0 June 10, 2024 5:23 am